No Meaning is Great Meaning

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Zen Master Seung Sahn used to say, “Life has no meaning, no reason, and no choice.” His next line was, “No meaning, no reason, and no choice is great meaning, great reason, and great choice.” Ultimately there is no meaning, but what do we do with the moment that we have?
 
So in his teaching, Zen Master Seung Sahn said Buddhism means to attain your true self and help this world. Of course it sounds linear, but it’s not really linear. It’s not first do one, then the other. But attain your true self is the answer to that question “What am I?” It’s not an intellectual “okay-now-I-know-who-I-am,” but we express ourselves moment to moment. That requires a stripping away or at least a seeing through that condition so that the greed, the anger, the ignorance is not controlling us.

Helping all beings gives us a direction in our life. Helping all beings means don’t live just for me. Living just for me leads us to selfishness and ultimately unhappiness because our chasing after our desires and trying to satisfy our desires does not work. Some of us might argue with that point, but the Buddha’s realization was ultimately we’ll end up with more desires. So an intention of helping this world already says my desire won’t be enough. So how can I use this moment to make the small world that I am living in a more peaceful, harmonious and healthy place? Sometimes that’s what we call good action. Sometimes that’s what we call bad action.  But the intention is turning ourselves towards the suffering of the world. In Buddhism, that’s called the Bodhisattva path.

Zen Master Bon Soeng

What is the Meaning of Life?

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What is the meaning of life? Zen Master Seung Sahn once said, “Human life has no meaning, no reason and no choice, but we have our practice to help us understand our true self. Then, we can change no meaning to Great Meaning, which means Great Love. We can change no reason to Great Reason, which means Great Compassion. Finally, we can change no choice to Great Choice, which means Great Vow and Bodhisattva Way.” This is a very interesting statement. Many people have some idea about the meaning of life. Some may even think that their idea is correct. So who is correct? What is it that gives life meaning? Where does the idea of meaning and life come from anyway? If we truly look and investigate these questions with sincerity, we realize that we really don’t know. Don’t know is the place before thinking. Before thinking, there is no life. There is no meaning. There is no “I” or “you”. There is nothing at all. 

If we take another step from this point, we can reflect this world just as it is, without adding anything to it. This is where truth is universal. This universal truth is not based on our ideas, beliefs, or opinions. It is not dependent on the color of skin, what religion we believe in, being rich or poor, nor being a man or woman. The truth is something every human being can perceive intrinsically. It is already clear in every moment. When we see this truth, we can also perceive the difficulties and dissatisfaction in our own lives which helps us to see the difficulties and dissatisfaction in the lives of others. We can see that many people are in great need of help. When we perceive that need clearly, then responding to this world is necessary. So no meaning turns into the Great Meaning, which is actually a vow to recognize our true self in every moment and help this world. Then love and compassion naturally appear in this world.

By Jason Quinn, JDPSN

Thousand Year Treasure

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We either don’t get what we want, then end up dissatisfied. Or, we get what we want, but we can’t keep it. There is not one thing in this world we can keep. Or, we get what we want but it is not enough or maybe we wish it could be just a little bit different. The Buddha said the reason we are dissatisfied is because we don’t understand our original nature and we don’t see the nature of cause and effect. 

The good news is that there is another way. As the calligraphy states, “Three days of looking into self, a thousand year treasure.” Three days of looking into the self means right now in this moment, what is this? What am I doing right now? What is this “I”? If we look at that with sincerity, honesty, and openness, it is possible to return to the mind before thinking. Before thinking is our original nature. In our school we call it “don’t know”.

“Don’t know” plus action is human being’s function. When we return to this moment, we also return back to the realm of name and form. Here we can use name and form in a clear and helpful way rather than name and form pulling us around and around. That even means using this “I”. Attachment to “I” results in I like and I don’t like. Using this “I” results in how may I help. Every moment. Every breath. How may I help? The name for that is Great Love, Great Compassion, the Great Bodhisattva Way. And that is a thousand year treasure for the whole universe.

By Jason Quinn, JDPSN  
Excerpt from Inka Speech  

The Great Bodhisattva Way

One, two, three. Where do these numbers come from? You already understand. Children want candy; business people want money; scholars want to become famous. There are many kinds of people and many directions. Where do they finally go? If you attain this point, you attain human nature and universal substance. If you attain universal substance, you can see and hear clearly, and your emotions, will, and wisdom can function correctly. Then your life is correct and you can help all beings. This is called the Great Bodhisattva Way.

From the Whole World is a Single Flower by Zen Master Seung Sahn

True Way

Our job is to really discover what our experience is. Don’t worry too much about what Buddhism says. Use the practice to discover your own experience and use that experience to attain your true self and help all beings. That’s authentic. That’s real. The teachings will help guide you, but use your own experience to find your true way, and then you can use that true way to help this world. Become who you really are. Each one of us has a different karmic life. Use yours to help the world. Okay?

By Zen Master Bon Soeng

Repaying The Universe

Our body is made up of four elements: earth, air, fire, and water. Everything we eat or use is also made of these four elements. So these four elements are us and we are these four elements. This means we are the universe and the universe is us. But how do you show your gratitude to the universe? If you understand that, you understand your correct job as a human being. A human being’s correct job is to make harmony with everything in the universe – with the sky, with the tree, with the dog, with the cat, with everything. If you have this harmony mind, you cannot kill an animal or kill a tree. That’s the correct idea. This correct idea appears when you put down your opinion, condition, situation and moment to moment keep correct function, correct situation, correct relationship. Then you and the four elements become one.


Anytime you have “I,” you have a problem. Our teaching is only do it. Don’t make I. When you do a good action, it’s not “I make good action”; it’s your original job as a human being. It’s your payment to the four elements, to the sun, the moon, the stars, the universe. A helping action is not good, not bad. Nature does its job without making good or bad. Water is flowing; is that good or bad? Sky is blue, tree is green; is that good or bad?


Don’t make anything. Just do it.


Excerpt from Earth, Air, Fire and Water Repaying The Universe

No Meaning is Great Meaning

Zen Master Seung Sahn used to say, “Life has no meaning, no reason, and no choice.” His next line was, “No meaning, no reason, and no choice is great meaning, great reason, and great choice.” Ultimately there is no meaning, but what do we do with the moment that we have?  

So in his teaching, Zen Master Seung Sahn said Buddhism means attain your true self and help this world. Of course it sounds linear, but it’s not really linear. It’s not first do one, then the other. But attain your true self is the answer to that question “What am I?” It’s not an intellectual “okay-now-I-know-who-I-am,” but we express ourselves moment to moment. That requires a stripping away or at least a seeing through that condition so that the greed, the anger, the ignorance is not controlling us.

Helping all beings gives us a direction in our life. Helping all beings means don’t live just for me. Living just for me leads us to selfishness and ultimately unhappiness because our chasing after our desires and trying to satisfy our desires does not work. Some of us might argue with that point, but the Buddha’s realization was ultimately we’ll end up with more desires. So an intention of helping this world already says my desire won’t be enough. So how can I use this moment to make the small world that I am living in a more peaceful, harmonious and healthy place? Sometimes that’s what we call good action. Sometimes that’s what we call bad action.  But the intention is turning ourselves towards the suffering of the world. In Buddhism, that’s called the Bodhisattva path.

Zen Master Bon Soeng

Will My Life Work Out?

The advise that Master Wu Kwang gave is "Pay your rent on the 1st, pay your taxes on the 15th of April, and everything will work out." He didn't say HOW they will work out. We all think "work out" means, "Oh everything will work out well for me." That's what goes in my head, and I imagine most everybody thinks that way. But, everybody gets sick at some point in time, everybody gets old, everybody dies. Anything and everything that is born into this world passes from this world. So, that's how it all works out.  

What are we going to do along the way? That's the realm of practice. Do we keep sticking our feet into the realm of suffering? Or do we connect with our practice center, really wonder about who we are and how to live in this world and find a way. "Enlightenment" is a beautiful word. Buddhism loves to throw it around, and nobody knows what it means. We all have some idea of what it would be if we were enlightened, but that's just our idea. Anything we think about it makes it too small, too limited, and too much just a creation of our human mind. Return to the practice, come back to this moment. What am I doing right now? How is it possible to help the situation?

By Zen Master Bon Soeng

Thousand Year Treasure

We either don’t get what we want, then end up dissatisfied. Or, we get what we want, but we can’t keep it. There is not one thing in this world we can keep. Or, we get what we want but it is not enough or maybe we wish it could be just a little bit different. The Buddha said the reason we are dissatisfied is because we don’t understand our original nature and we don’t see the nature of cause and effect. 

The good news is that there is another way. As the calligraphy states, “Three days of looking into self, a thousand year treasure.” Three days of looking into the self means right now in this moment, what is this? What am I doing right now? What is this “I”? If we look at that with sincerity, honesty, and openness, it is possible to return to the mind before thinking. Before thinking is our original nature. In our school we call it “don’t know”.

“Don’t know” plus action is human being’s function. When we return to this moment, we also return back to the realm of name and form. Here we can use name and form in a clear and helpful way rather than name and form pulling us around and around. That even means using this “I”. Attachment to “I” results in I like and I don’t like. Using this “I” results in how may I help. Every moment. Every breath. How may I help? The name for that is Great Love, Great Compassion, the Great Bodhisattva Way. And that is a thousand year treasure for the whole universe.

By Jason Quinn, JDPSN  
Excerpt from Inka Speech  
Published by Primary Point Summer 2015, Volume 32, Number 2  

The Great Bodhisattva Way

One, two, three. Where do these numbers come from? You already understand. Children want candy; business people want money; scholars want to become famous. There are many kinds of people and many directions. Where do they finally go?

If you attain this point, you attain human nature and universal substance. If you attain universal substance, you can see and hear clearly, and your emotions, will, and wisdom can function correctly. Then your life is correct and you can help all beings. This is called the Great Bodhisattva Way.
 
From the Whole World is a Single Flower by Zen Master Seung Sahn

True Way

Our job is to really discover what our experience is. Don’t worry too much about what Buddhism says. Use the practice to discover your own experience and use that experience to attain your true self and help all beings. That’s authentic. That’s real. The teachings will help guide you, but use your own experience to find your true way, and then you can use that true way to help this world. Become who you really are. Each one of us has a different karmic life. Use yours to help the world. Okay?  
 
By Zen Master Bon Soeng

Purpose of Zen

That's Zen mind. It's not being perfect. It's not being able to do everything right, and do it in such a way that somebody will tell this wonderful story about you that a thousand years from now people will still be talking about. It's simply paying attention, meeting the moment and helping. Our teacher, Zen Master Seung Sahn said, "The purpose of Zen is to attain your true self and help others." So the helping others, that's pretty clear. Not judgmental, not with any sense of superiority. Attain your true self. What am I? Just help. 

By Zen Master Bon Soeng