What Kind Of Buddhism Was That?

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The Buddha saw a star and attained enlightenment. What kind of Buddhism was that?  


If we have some idea of what we are or who we are, it is usually connected with some view of the world. It may be a religious view, political view, a man or woman view, a black or white view, even a Zen view. All of these views have their place, but if we are attached to any view, then we can longer see the truth. This is ignorance. We ignore the truth by seeing the world through our own attached view. And many times we think our view is correct. This attachment results in fear and anger which causes many human beings to respond to the world that results in much suffering.   

If we are sincere and diligent in our practice, the way of ignorance, anger and greed, can turn into wisdom, love and compassion. If we can return to our true self and perceive the truth of this world, without attaching to any view, then it is possible to help ourselves and all those around us.  
By Jason Quinn, JDPSN

Right View is No View

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The first of the Buddha’s Eightfold Path is clear view, or right view. Right view means clarity. Right view means letting go of "my" view to be able to perceive the moment. We all know what this is like. There are times we are involved in an argument, and in the middle of it we start laughing because we realize how stupid it is. In that moment we can see clearly.

 To see clearly, we have to let go of our own perspective, our own opinion of right and wrong, what I should do and what you should do. If we can let go of that, then it’s possible to have what the Buddha called Right View. Sometimes it is said, Right View is the complete Eightfold Path. If we can keep Right View which is No View, not my personal view but before my view, then it’s all taken care of. It is easy to say, hard to do.

By Zen Master Bon Soeng

What Is Correct?

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Correct is not conventionally correct because it’s not about right versus wrong. The Buddha talked about Clear Seeing, being able to perceive the moment as it is. When we talk about correct situation, we’re talking about perceiving the moment as it is, without adding to it our own particular view or our own particular idea. Just seeing clearly. We call that correct.

When we talk about correct relationship, we talk about what is actually the relationships present in the moment, not colored by my desire, not colored by my particular slant on things; but what actually is it? We all add something. So this "correct" we’re talking about takes away this taint of "I". Just see, what is it? That’s the point the Buddha said when he talked about clear seeing.
 
Clear seeing is the first of The Eightfold Path. It’s been said that if you can attain clear seeing, you’ve already got all the rest of the Eightfold Path. Because it’s that stuckness in "I" that we get lost in.

Zen Master Bon Soeng

No "I", No "You"

One day a student asked Zen Master Man Gong, "Where is Buddha's teaching?"
"Right in front of you." Man Gong replied.
The student said, "You say, 'in front of you', but I cannot see it."
"You have 'I', so you cannot see."
"Do you see?" the student asked.
Man Gong answered, "If you make 'I' you cannot see. But if you make 'you', it is even more diffucult see."
The students asked, "If I have no 'I', no 'you', then who is speaking?"
The student was then instantly enlightened.

Story Of The Old Farmer

There is a story of an old farmer who had worked his crops for many years. One day his horse ran away. Upon hearing the news, his neighbors came to visit. "Such bad luck," they said sympathetically. 

"Maybe," said the farmer

The next morning the horse returned, bringing with it three other wild horses. "How wonderful," the neighbors exclaimed.

"Maybe," the farmer replied.

The following day, his son tried to ride one of the untamed horses, was thrown, and broke his leg. The neighbors again came to offer their sympathy on his misfortune.

"Maybe," answered the farmer.

The day after, military officials came to the village to draft young men into the army. Seeing that the son's leg was broken, they passed him by. The neighbors congratulated the farmer on how well things had turned out.

"Maybe," said the farmer

Clear View

The Buddha saw a star and attained enlightenment. What kind of Buddhism was that?

If we have some idea of what we are or who we are, it is usually connected with some view of the world. It may be a religious view, political view, a man or woman view, a black or white view, even a Zen view. All of these views have their place, but if we are attached to any view, then we can longer longer see the truth. This is ignorance. We ignore the truth by seeing the world through our own attached view. And many times we think our view is correct. This attachment results in fear and anger which causes many human beings to respond to the world that results in much suffering. 

If we are sincere and diligent in our practice, the way of ignorance, anger and greed, can turn into wisdom, love and compassion. If we can return to our true self and perceive the truth of this world, without attaching to any view, then it is possible to help ourselves and all those around us.

By Jason Quinn, JDPSN
Excerpt from Buddha's Enlightenment