Right View is No View

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The first of the Buddha’s Eightfold Path is clear view, or right view. Right view means clarity. Right view means letting go of "my" view to be able to perceive the moment. We all know what this is like. There are times we are involved in an argument, and in the middle of it we start laughing because we realize how stupid it is. In that moment we can see clearly.

 To see clearly, we have to let go of our own perspective, our own opinion of right and wrong, what I should do and what you should do. If we can let go of that, then it’s possible to have what the Buddha called Right View. Sometimes it is said, Right View is the complete Eightfold Path. If we can keep Right View which is No View, not my personal view but before my view, then it’s all taken care of. It is easy to say, hard to do.

By Zen Master Bon Soeng

Responding To Fear

Any stink of "I" perverts our view, because we make something and we shape it to fit our own personal idea. We respond to fear by trying to circle the wagons. We circle the wagons with our thoughts and our rejection of things. All of that is a response to fear of uncertainty. The fear of the unknown. 

When something happens that we don't like, we freak out. And often in that freakout, we make matters worse. We try to apply this skewed view, this perverted view to fix the situation. But in the process, very often we make it worse.
The first rule of falling into a hole is to stop digging. Our impulse is to keep digging, and we think if we just keep doing what we're used to doing, that will take care of it. But if we can stop digging, perceive the fear, rather than immediately relying on everything we've done before... Breathe....... Stop...... Actually Look. Actually let go of that view and just look. 

It's possible to actually see what's happening in this very moment. If we can see it clearly, it's possible to respond to it clearly. But if we cannot see it clearly, we'll never be able to respond to it clearly. So that's why in the Buddhist teaching, Right View is the doorway into everything else. Because as long as we stay stuck in that perverted view, we'll keep recreating the vision of our own experience rather than entering into what's real.

By Zen Master Bon Soeng

Clear View

The Buddha saw a star and attained enlightenment. What kind of Buddhism was that?

If we have some idea of what we are or who we are, it is usually connected with some view of the world. It may be a religious view, political view, a man or woman view, a black or white view, even a Zen view. All of these views have their place, but if we are attached to any view, then we can longer longer see the truth. This is ignorance. We ignore the truth by seeing the world through our own attached view. And many times we think our view is correct. This attachment results in fear and anger which causes many human beings to respond to the world that results in much suffering. 

If we are sincere and diligent in our practice, the way of ignorance, anger and greed, can turn into wisdom, love and compassion. If we can return to our true self and perceive the truth of this world, without attaching to any view, then it is possible to help ourselves and all those around us.

By Jason Quinn, JDPSN
Excerpt from Buddha's Enlightenment

Right View is No View

The first of the Buddha’s Eightfold Path is clear view, or right view. Right view means clarity. Right view means letting go of "my" view to be able to perceive the moment. We all know what this is like. There are times we are involved in an argument, and in the middle of it we start laughing because we realize how stupid it is. In that moment we can see clearly. 
 
To see clearly, we have to let go of our own perspective, our own opinion of right and wrong, what I should do and what you should do. If we can let go of that, then it’s possible to have what the Buddha called Right View. Sometimes it is said, Right View is the complete Eightfold Path.  If we can keep Right View which is No View, not my personal view but before my view, then it’s all taken care of.  It is easy to say, hard to do.

By Zen Master Bon Soeng

Responding To Fear

Any stink of "I" perverts our view, because we make something and we shape it to fit our own personal idea. We respond to fear by trying to circle the wagons. We circle the wagons with our thoughts and our rejection of things. All of that is a response to fear of uncertainty. The fear of the unknown. 

When something happens that we don't like, we freak out. And often in that freakout, we make matters worse. We try to apply this skewed view, this perverted view to fix the situation. But in the process, very often we make it worse.

The first rule of falling into a hole is to stop digging. Our impulse is to keep digging, and we think if we just keep doing what we're used to doing, that will take care of it. But if we can stop digging, perceive the fear, rather than immediately relying on everything we've done before... Breathe....... Stop...... Actually Look. Actually let go of that view and just look. 

It's possible to actually see what's happening in this very moment. If we can see it clearly, it's possible to respond to it clearly. But if we cannot see it clearly, we'll never be able to respond to it clearly. So that's why in the Buddhist teaching, Right View is the doorway into everything else. Because as long as we stay stuck in that perverted view, we'll keep recreating the vision of our own experience rather than entering into what's real.

By Zen Master Bon Soeng

Right View is No View

Dont-look-directly-at-the-Sun1-300x199.png

The first of the Buddha’s Eightfold Path is clear view, or right view. Right view means clarity. Right view means letting go of "my" view to be able to perceive the moment. We all know what this is like. There are times we are involved in an argument, and in the middle of it we start laughing because we realize how stupid it is. In that moment we can see clearly. 
 
To see clearly, we have to let go of our own perspective, our own opinion of right and wrong, what I should do and what you should do. If we can let go of that, then it’s possible to have what the Buddha called Right View. Sometimes it is said, Right View is the complete Eightfold Path.  If we can keep Right View which is No View, not my personal view but before my view, then it’s all taken care of.  It is easy to say, hard to do.

By Zen Master Bon Soeng